Last edited by Malale
Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Amebiasis found in the catalog.

Amebiasis

James G Shaffer

Amebiasis

a biomedical problem

by James G Shaffer

  • 45 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by C. C. Thomas in Springfield, Ill .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Amebiasis.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 134-151.

    Statementby James G. Shaffer, William H. Shlaes [and] Ryle A. Radke. With a foreword by Walter L. Palmer.
    ContributionsShlaes, William H., joint author., Radke, Ryle A., joint author.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC121.A5 S5
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiii, 172 p.
    Number of Pages172
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5941721M
    LC Control Number65012385
    OCLC/WorldCa3043550

    Amoebiasis most commonly affects young adults and is rare below the age of 5 years. Amoebic dysentery is very rare under the age of 2 years, when dysentery is more commonly due to Shigella. Outbreaks have occurred following water supply contamination, as the cysts are resistant to chlorine. Amebiasis spreads from eating food or water that has been contaminated with feces. This is sometimes due to the use of human waste as fertilizer. Amebiasis is also spread through person-to-person contact. The infection occurs worldwide. It is most common in tropical areas where crowded living conditions and poor sanitation exist.

      Amoebiasis is a common infection of the human gastro-intestinal tract. Amoebiasis is more closely related to poor sanitation and socioeconomic status than to climate. It has worldwide distribution. It is a major health problem in China, South East and West Asia and Latin America, especially Mexico. Amoebiasis is a disease caused by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica. What is Amebiasis? Amebiasis is a disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica, a unicellular eukaryotic parasite. E. histolytica belongs to thegenus Entamoeba, along with 5 other parasites: E. coli, E. hartamanni, E. dispar, E. gingivalis, and E. polecki. However, only E. histolytica causes Amebiasis. Who can get Amebiasis?

    Amebiasis definition: infestation with amoebas, esp. with a protozoan (Entamoeba histolytica) parasitic in | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples. amebiasis: Definition Amebiasis is an infectious disease caused by a parasitic one-celled microorganism (protozoan) called Entamoeba histolytica. Persons with amebiasis may experience a wide range of symptoms, including diarrhea, fever, and cramps. The disease may also affect the intestines, liver, or other parts of the body. Description.


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Amebiasis by James G Shaffer Download PDF EPUB FB2

Amebiasis is distributed worldwide, particularly in the tropics, most commonly in areas of poor sanitation. Long-term travelers (duration >6 months) are significantly more likely than short-term travelers (duration. Amebiasis. American Academy of Pediatrics.

In: Pickering LK, ed. Red Book: Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. 25th ed. Elk Grove Village, Ill: American Academy of Pediatrics; – Invasive amebiasis probably is second only to malarial disease as a cause of protozoan-mediated death.

Amebiasis or amoebic dysentery is a common parasitic enteral infection. It is caused by any of the amoebas of the Entamoeba group. Amoebiasis may present with no symptoms or mild to severe symptoms including abdominal pain, diarrhea, or bloody diarrhea.

Severe complications may include inflammation and perforation resulting in peritonitis. People affected may develop anemia.[1][2][3].

Amebiasis - DPDx, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria (DPDM), DPDx applications, diagnosis of parasitic diseases, diagnostic reference resources, Amebiasis book quizzes, parasites and parasitic diseases, parasitic diseases, training function, emerging parasitic diseases, global, worldwide, United States and abroad, biologic specimens, life cycle, laboratory, health.

This book documents and presents new developments in the study of amebiasis, one of the neglected tropical diseases. Nearly 50 million people worldwide are infected with the pathogen Entamoeba histolytica, causing large-scale morbidity and mortality particularly in developing book will help clinicians for better diagnosis and management of the disease, researchers for initiating Amebiasis book Paperback.

Amebiasis. In: Kimberlin DW, Brady MT, Jackson MA, Long SS, eds. Red Book: Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. American Academy of Pediatrics; ; is a rapid access, point-of-care medical reference for primary care and emergency clinicians. Started inthis collection now contains interlinked topic pages divided into a tree of 31 specialty books and chapters.

Amebiasis is a parasitic infection of the intestines caused by the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, or E. symptoms of amebiasis include loose stool, abdominal cramping, and stomach. Amebiasis (Tropical Medicine: Science and Practice): Medicine & Health Science Books @ In every research laboratory there is “the book”—the standard text, given to people newly entering the field and frequently referred to by the rest of us.

In the amoebiasis world, this was the massive and magisterial volume edited by Jonathan : John P. Ackers. Amebiasis is a serious, highly contagious disease in snakes that is caused by a parasitic infection.

Occurring worldwide in snake colonies as well as in captivity, this parasitic disease often causes death in reptiles, such as lizards, snakes and sometimes tortoises. Parasites - Amebiasis. Amebiasis is a disease caused by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica. It can affect anyone, although it is more common in people who live in tropical areas with poor sanitary conditions.

Diagnosis can be difficult because other parasites can look very similar to E. histolytica when seen under a microscope. Infected people. histolytica can live in the large intestine (colon) without causing damage to the intestine. In some cases, it invades the colon wall, causing colitis, acute dysentery, or long-term (chronic) infection can also spread through the bloodstream to the liver.

In rare cases, it can spread to the lungs, brain, or other organs. This book documents and presents new developments in the study of amebiasis, one of the neglected tropical diseases. Nearly 50 million people worldwide are infected with the pathogen Entamoeba histolytica, causing large-scale morbidity and mortality particularly in developing book will help clinicians for better diagnosis and management of the disease, researchers for initiating.

lists trials that are related to Amebiasis. Click on the link to go to to read descriptions of these studies. Please note: Studies listed on the website are listed for informational purposes only; being listed does not reflect an endorsement by GARD or the strongly recommend that you talk with a trusted healthcare provider before.

Background Amebiasis, which is caused by Entamoeba histolytica, is a re-emerging public health issue owing to sexually transmitted infection (STI) in Japan. However, epidemiological data are. Get this from a library. Amebiasis. [Jonathan I Ravdin;] -- An overview of the field of Amebiases, encompassing all aspects of epidemiology, clinical management and research.

It features contributions from physicians and scientists worldwide, and includes. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Faust, Ernest Carroll, Amebiasis. Springfield, Ill., Thomas [©] (OCoLC) Online version. Amebiasis is defined as infection with Entamoeba histolytica, regardless of associated symptomatology.

In resource-rich nations, this parasitic protozoan is seen primarily in travelers to and. Amoebiasis Cause. Caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Transmission. Transmission occurs via the faecal–oral route, either directly by person-to-person contact or indirectly by eating or drinking faecally contaminated food or water.

This book documents and presents new developments in the study of amebiasis, one of the neglected tropical diseases. Nearly 50 million people worldwide are infected with the pathogen Entamoeba histolytica, causing large-scale morbidity and mortality particularly in developing book will help clinicians for better diagnosis and management of the disease, researchers for initiating Brand: Springer Japan.Amebiasis (amebic dysentery) Reviewed: September What is amebiasis?

Amebiasis is an intestinal (bowel) illness caused by a microscopic (tiny) parasite called Entamoeba histolytica, which is spread through human feces (poop).Often there are no symptoms, but, sometimes it causes diarrhea (loose stool/poop), nausea (a feeling of sickness in the stomach), and weight loss.Cutaneous infection with Entamoeba histolytica (amebiasis cutis) is quite rare, occurring chiefly in the tropics.

4–6 A recent study of amebiasis cutis from an endemic area in South Africa found 41 patients with cutaneous disease over an 8-year period. 7 It usually develops as a complication of amebic colitis, producing irregular areas of.